News & Events

Walgreens to train for pharmacy staff in Mental Health First Aid

From Modern Healthcare:

Walgreens Boots Alliance launched a training program for pharmacists to learn how to better identify warning signs of mental health and substance use problems in their patients and help them during crisis situations.

The retailer partnered with the American Pharmacists Association and the National Council for Behavioral Health to create an online version of the Mental Health First Aid program, which was developed in 2001 in Australia to provide individuals who weren’t clinicians with strategies to help someone experiencing a mental health crisis.

…The Walgreens partnership is the first collaboration of its kind with one of the country’s giant retail pharmacy chains.

Read the full article at Modern Healthcare.

“Despite My Diagnosis…” Stigma Story by CCM Student Alexa Wyszkowski

The Youngtown Edition (the school newspaper of the County College of Morris) is working with two other CCM clubs this semester, Active Minds and Writers Club, on a series about students in the process of recovery. This series is called “Despite My Diagnosis.” Read one of these stories, by Alexa Wyszkowski:

Alexa holds up a sign that says Despite my diagnosis, I am enough.
Alexa Wyszkowski is more than her diagnosis.

I have allergies. I have asthma. I have anxiety.

These were all the reasons why I used to tell myself that I could not do things, was undeserving of things and could not achieve things. These were the reasons I told myself I was not capable of having great friendships and relationships. The reasons why I felt I could never be enough even when I gave my all.

In high school, something changed as I became more and more involved in my school community. I became someone who was not as defined by their allergies, asthma, and anxiety. Instead, I was defined by how much I cared and dedicated my time to the school clubs and activities.

By my senior year, I had joined as many clubs and organizations as I could and balanced all my time so I could actively participate in as many activities as possible. I loved meeting new people and finding those special people who attended the club meetings and events not just for their resume, but because they wanted to be part of something greater than themselves. Being a part of a club, a team, an organization, an event, an activity involves this feeling of belonging and having the ability to make a difference. I loved being able to help people and show them how they too could help others.

I had good grades, was involved in everything I could be in, was accepted to every college I applied to and even received some awards and recognition for all my work in these clubs and activities. Except all of this was not enough.

I had an opportunity to go to college for free. And yet I couldn’t go to college for free. I had missed the class rank requirement that I needed by less than one percent. I was not enough.

I went into college as a hospitality major because I thought that was the only way to continue on my journey to help others. I thought that the place I started working at in high school was going to be my forever job. And this was all so closed minded of me. If only I had an open mind then maybe I would have made different and better choices, but then I would probably not be where I am today.

Early into the start of college I entered my first relationship and told myself it was okay if they never were able to understand me. I thought that even if they weren’t understanding of my allergies, asthma, and anxiety it would still be okay. I didn’t think I should expect them to understand or want to learn to understand. For some reason, I thought when I gave everything and it wasn’t enough for them that I should just keep giving.

I did this with the first job that I thought was my dream job. I did this with my first relationship.

Until the winter came and I remember for the first time feeling completely alone and empty. I ignored it and continued giving as much as I could. I dived into this mindset to show my relationship and my job that I could be more than my allergies, asthma, anxiety and try to prove to them that I could be enough until there was no room for anything else in my life. I didn’t have time for myself, I didn’t have time for my other friends, I didn’t have time to breathe. I thought I had to change the perspective of my workplace and my partner. That the role I was given was to change both of them, to make them understand.

I cannot change people. I cannot change places. I cannot change things. I cannot change the past. I cannot change fate. I cannot change the fact that I have allergies, asthma, and anxiety. All I can do is work on changing myself, becoming a part of something greater than myself and offering my light even in the darkest moments. Even as a leader I cannot say that I have ever been the only person that contributed to something changing. For something to change it takes many people working together who share the desire to create something more. I can share this passion and give it to others, but I cannot force it. I cannot change people. People can only change themselves and to do that, they have to want to change.

I want to change myself. I started high school as this person who was shy and insecure and did not believe in herself. By the end of high school, I started to become more confident in who I was and what I was meant to do. However in addition to my allergies, asthma, and anxiety, I let not getting free college, the job I had and the relationship I was in continue to tell me that I was not enough. That I could never be enough.

It took me a year and a half into college to realize that what I thought I was supposed to do with my life was not at all what I should have been doing. And this time it was not because I thought I was not enough. It was because I realized I was more than enough all along.

For as long as I can remember I have loved four things: reading, writing, teaching, and giving. And I left high school and entered college thinking that I was not enough to be able to study and have a career in something that involved all of those things. So to start I chose to study hospitality and plan my career around it because I thought I would just help and give in that way.

What I didn’t realize was that there are so many other ways of being able to help and give by also teaching and involving reading and writing. That I am capable to do things that I thought I wouldn’t, couldn’t and shouldn’t be able to do.

There will always be people and places who will tell me that I’m never enough. That I should give up what I have and who I am because it is not enough for them. As much as I used to give importance to making everyone and everything better and happy, I no longer feel the constant need to do so. I just want to be myself with my allergies, asthma, anxiety and all my past people, places and experiences, and still be able to make positive connections with others without feeling that I am not enough. I am enough and thinking that I was never enough is something I am trying to leave in the past.

#StopThePain

Ftom StopThePainNJ.org:

The Community Coalition for a Safe and Healthy Morris partnered with Life Center Stage to create an opioid awareness campaign #StopThePain, where the power of personal stories, photography and videos are used to bring light to how the opioid epidemic affects real people. StopThePainNJ.org has been created as a platform for the community to understand others’ lived experience, find resources and, importantly, submit their own stories.

It is our vision that by creating this campaign we are able to impact the community at-large by inspiring hope, educating, and destroying stigma. With your help we can make this happen!

The #StopThePain initiative started with opioid awareness video spots airing in Morris County movie theaters and on online video platforms. These awareness videos featured stories from people with lived experience with the opioid epidemic.

Each month, StopThePainNJ.org features real stories from community members sharing their experience with opioids, substance use disorder, recovery, and stigma, as well as real-life solutions:

    • Michael Cavallo, musician, public speaker and winner of the 2018 Knock Out Opioid Abuse Songwriter’s Contest was among one of our first participants. His story sheds light on how opioids can affect anyone, on the struggles of getting into and staying in treatment as well as hope that recovery is possible.
      • “It’s not just about recovery. It is about dealing with personal relationships, getting a job and showing up for it. Learning how to budget your finances and food shopping when you have little money. Between my social workers, the Milestone House and CARES in Rockaway, I was surrounded by positive people that taught me how to show up for life.” 
    • Loren O’Donnell, a dad who lost his 20-year-old daughter Molly to the opioid epidemic, shared his story. For the past few years, Loren has been inspiring others through his prevention and recovery outreach, sharing his daughter’s poetry about her addiction as well as his experience and original songs.
      •  “I unleashed repressed feelings, I needed that. Thank you. I am forever grateful.” 
    • We are currently featuring Kelly LaBar, a person in long-term recovery since January 2003. Kelly does wonderful work in the recovery field as a CPRS and Project Coordinator for the Opiate Overdose Prevention Program at CARES. She is also an Ammon Foundation Empowerment Coach.
      • “When I started my recovery journey it was not an epidemic. I was one of a handful of young people seeking treatment. Now we lose over 100 people a day to an overdose and there are more young people struggling and seeking treatment. We have more options to help people find recovery, more advocates, more people recovering out loud, more treatment and recovery support for individuals and family members, more legislation. There is still much more work to be done but we are mobilizing and moving forward.”

The response to this campaign has been great, and we would like to see it keep growing to become something even bigger. We know that in sharing our stories, we engage people at every level – not just in their minds but also through their emotions, educating through personal experience. By focusing on our collective experiences and what has supported those affected by this crisis, we put everyone in a stronger position to undermine stigmatizing belief systems and lay out new possibilities for social change

To fight this epidemic it is going to take all of us! With your help, we can grow this initiative even further and #StopThePain.

Ways that you can get involved:

Stigma Free Third Anniversary – Videos of Event

On April 24, the Morris County Board of Freeholders this week recognized the third anniversary of the county’s Stigma-Free Initiative and urged all of the county’s 39 towns, plus school districts, businesses, law enforcement, and religious and nonprofit organizations to join the countywide effort to eradicate the stigma associated with mental illness and substance use disorders. Here are some videos from the event:

Freeholder Kathy DeFillippo

Erica Valvano, of Hope One

Wendy Sefcik, of Remembering T.J.

CCM Students Behind “Despite My Diagnosis” – Alexa Wyszkowski of Rockaway, Raven Resch of Belvidere, and Marco Mirlas of Roxbury

“Despite My Diagnosis…” Stigma Story by CCM Faculty Advisor Russ Crespolini

The Youngtown Edition (the school newspaper of the County College of Morris) is working with two other CCM clubs this semester, Active Minds and Writers Club, on a series about students in the process of recovery. This series is called “Despite My Diagnosis.” Read one of these stories, by CCM Faculty Advisor Russ Crespolini:

Russ CrespoliniTwo decades ago I underwent surgery to repair two ruptured discs at the base of my spine that had robbed me of motor control in my left leg and caused me considerable pain for almost six  months.

At the time I was a junior and an undergraduate and ended up missing a large portion of the academic year. I had just started seriously dating someone and I did not know whether this new relationship could weather the ups and downs of this serious physical infirmity. Epidural and steroid injections, limited mobility and chronic pain had become a steady part of my life. I wish I could tell you that the surgery fixed everything and twenty years later as adjunct professor and faculty advisor to the Youngtown Edition I face each day pain-free.

But I would be lying.

Because it was after my surgery I was diagnosed with spinal stenosis. The doctor’s told me that this narrowing of my spinal canal was something I was born with and eventually it the passage would narrow enough to constrain the nerves and put me in a wheelchair.

This was going to be exacerbated by the scar tissue left over by my surgery. Less space in the canal for the nerves to move freely, after all. I was also going to deal with varying levels of pain for the rest of my life. I wish I could tell you that I began exercising and dieting in earnest and did everything I could better my odds.

That would also be a lie.

After surgery, I went back to campus, cane in hand and got special permission to take 25 credits a semester to graduate on time and continue on my path to graduate school. I also ate my way to 400 pounds and dealt with the grinding of chronic pain with prescription anti-inflammatory and pain medication.

Dealing with chronic pain is something that so many people experience but never talk about. The way it may take you ten minutes to get out of bed in the morning when others take ten seconds.  The way it gnaws at your attention span when you are trying to focus on work or school. The way the pain activates your adrenal gland and wears you out. Chronic pain makes you so very very tired. It also makes you jealous. You are jealous of the people around you who aren’t suffering as you do. Not because you would wish this on them, but because they take for granted what they have. That physical normalcy you have been denied.

I wrote this, not because this is a pity party for me, but because I was so inspired and humbled by the previous Despite My Diagnosis columns written by brave authors who shared their stories with Youngtown.

And because I know that so many people deal with varying levels of chronic pain and choose to suffer in silence or be isolated because they are afraid they might snap or be quick-tempered with someone. But chronic pain can also do something unexpectedly beautiful.

It can make you appreciate what you do have.

On the days when your pain is more manageable, you appreciate being able to walk freely, to transition from a seated position to standing without wincing. You appreciate being able to mow your lawn, or walk through a store or take a day trip to the beach. You appreciate the friends and family who love you and care about you and support you. And that builds a reserve of strength you can draw on in your darker days.

But you have to do your part. I did change my lifestyle. I exercise daily to keep myself mobile (it takes a lot of work to look this mediocre) and I did lose over 100 pounds I needed to lose. I no longer take prescription medication for pain management. I take the occasional Aleve.

And I also sought counseling and help.

So for those of you out there with chronic pain, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Do not suffer in silence. Don’t be afraid to explain to people what is happening with you and ask for their patience and support. It is ok to have bad days. It is ok to feel depressed and to feel your lot in life is unfair. It is not ok to let those feelings overwhelm you. Lean on those relationships that provide you comfort.

I made it because I had people who believed in me. I had an undergraduate advisor who put herself out there for me and supported me and guided me and set the template for how I treat my own students. I still text her daily. I had family and friends who were there when I woke up in the hospital and continued to be a presence in my daily life. Those relationships that are meant to be will strengthen. That girl I was in the new relationship with 20 years ago when I had my surgery is my wife of 13 years.

For those of you who know someone with chronic pain, do your best to be patient. Celebrate the days they feel well and listen to them when they are feeling down. I still have my bad days, when the pain and weakness creeps down my leg. Usually when the weather changes.

So despite my diagnosis, I am a journalist, father, husband, educator, advisor, improv-artist, video-game enthusiast, Union President, and adjunct professor. But because of my diagnosis, I appreciate, and enjoy, those opportunities more than I will ever be able to express.

Editor’s note: Russ Crespolini is a working journalist and adjunct professor at County College of Morris and The College of Saint Elizabeth where he advises both campus newspapers. He wrote this column in the hopes other faculty, staff and administrators would share their story.

“Despite My Diagnosis…” Stigma Story by CCM Student Andres Ortiz

The Youngtown Edition (the school newspaper of the County College of Morris) is working with two other CCM clubs this semester, Active Minds and Writers Club, on a series about students in the process of recovery. This series is called “Despite My Diagnosis.” Read one of these stories, by Andres Ortiz:

Andres Ortiz holds a sign that says, Despite my Diagnosis, autism success.
Andres Ortiz

My name is Andres Ortiz and I have high functioning autism, which means I think differently and often have trouble understanding social cues and knowing how to communicate with others. My autism hasn’t stopped me from being a talented drummer and I’ve been playing in bands for about 14 years. Sometimes it’s been easiest to make friends through my love of music.

I started going to different schools when I was three. When I was younger, I felt that nobody understood me and that caused me to act out sometimes. Once I went to the Newmark School in Scotch Plains, NJ and then Montgomery Academy in Basking Ridge, NJ everything got easier because people there understood how I thought and learn.

In high school, I had ups and downs because I was also diagnosed with Lyme Disease. I have trouble staying awake and my memory is bad sometimes but I continue to try my very best. It’s interesting that my brain always remembers how to play music and facts about it, but I can’t read it. People with autism often know a whole lot about one topic and mine is music.

I came to CCM through the College Steps Program because I wanted to be more independent and I am proud to say I am doing well in all my classes. However, sometimes I still struggle with sleeping, remembering important due dates and details, asking for help at the right time, and communicating with others. Now I have peer mentors, who are also CCM students through College Steps, who help me with these problems as well as note-taking, studying, independent living and social skills, and budgeting. All College Steps students, mentors, and our Program Coordinator, Nancy Tichenor, meet to work on life, employment and community skills to help us with college and life after we leave.

I have made friends in my classes and through my mentors through College Steps and of course, I enjoy the other students in the program. We can often be found laughing together a lot. On May 6, we’re having a big charity event for The Seeing Eye and we’re trying to raise approximately $90.00 because The Seeing Eye is celebrating its 90 birthday. We hope it will be a great success. Come have a piece of pizza and support our fundraiser. And say, “Hi.” Maybe you’ll want to be a mentor next year. College Steps has on campus, flexible, paid positions for second-semester students interested in becoming a mentor. If you are interested in applying to become a mentor, email nancy@collegesteps.org!

Freeholders Celebrate Third Anniversary of Morris County’s Stigma-Free Initiative

Honor Residents and Students for Efforts on Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders

The Morris County Board of Freeholders this week recognized the third anniversary of the county’s Stigma-Free Initiative and urged all of the county’s 39 towns, plus school districts, businesses, law enforcement, and religious and nonprofit organizations to join the countywide effort to eradicate the stigma associated with mental illness and substance use disorders.

 

 

 

On April 27, 2016, the freeholders unanimously passed a resolution designating Morris County as a Stigma-Free community. It noted that one in four county residents had experienced mental illness, including substance use, and that the stigma associated with these disorders was identified as the primary reason individuals fail to seek the help they need to recover.

“Today, we are re-emphasizing our dedication to raising awareness of these illnesses by creating an environment where affected individuals are supported in their efforts to achieve wellness and recovery,’’ Freeholder Director Doug Cabana said on Wednesday.

“We understood back in 2016 that Stigma-Free had to be more than just a slogan, that it had to become a fabric of our county community to have any real meaning,’’ said Freeholder Kathy DeFillippo. Today, I can tell you that we have made great progress … that we are now part of a 35-town Stigma-Free coalition, and growing.’’ (view video here.)

Kinnelon Borough last week became the 35th town in the county to join the initiative.

To mark the third anniversary of the passage of the county’s Stigma-Free resolution, the freeholders on Wednesday (April 24) honored several residents who have shown leadership in this countywide Stigma-Free effort.

Honored were Montville resident Wendy Sefcik, Morris County Sheriff’s Cpl. Erica Valvano, and County College of Morris students Alexa Wyszkowski of Rockaway, Raven Resch of Belvidere, and Marco Mirlas of Roxbury.

Wendy Sefcik: As the mother of a young man who struggled with depression, she has been extraordinarily courageous and generous to share her family’s story of teen depression and suicide, and the lessons learned that inspires hope for recovery in a stigma free environment. View the video here.

Erica Valvano: She has been a driving force behind Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon’s Hope One mobile substance use recovery and resource initiative, working closely with persons impacted by the heroin and opioid epidemic, and sharing lessons learned to inspire hope for recovery in a Stigma-Free environment. View the video here.

Alexa Wyszkowski, Raven Resch, and Marco Mirlas: They collaborated on the “Despite My Diagnosis” series about students in the process of recovery that has run in the County College of Morris newspaper, the Youngtown Edition, helping to create a Stigma-Free culture on the campus of the college community. View the video here.

“We congratulate these honorees for their efforts to help remove the personal and institutional stigma long associated with mental illness and addiction, turning the discussion toward helping people without judgment, just as we would when someone with another chronic illness asks for help,’’ said Morris County Mental Health Administrator Laurie Becker.

“Morris County’s stigma-free campaign has had a profound impact on public attitudes about people who have substance use and mental health disorders. These no longer are viewed as character flaws but as struggles that human beings are having that deserve compassion and support,” said Morris County Sheriff James M. Gannon.

Learn more about the countywide Stigma Free Initiative and take the Stigma-Free pledge at https://morriscountystigmafree.org/

Learn more about the Sheriff’s Hope One program athttps://sheriff.morriscountynj.gov/community/hope-one/

“Despite My Diagnosis…” Stigma Story by CCM Student Matthew Bristol

The Youngtown Edition (the school newspaper of the County College of Morris) is working with two other CCM clubs this semester, Active Minds and Writers Club, on a series about students in the process of recovery. This series is called “Despite My Diagnosis.” Read one of these stories, by Matthew Bristol:

Matthew Bristol holding a sign saying Despite my diagnosis, I still find ways to laugh.
Matthew Bristol

I’ve spent my entire life using humor as my go-to way of dealing with adversity. It’s given me a pretty good sense of humor, at least in my opinion, although some of my professors may disagree. No matter how bad things get I still find ways to laugh. My family often says, “If you can’t laugh at yourself, you can always laugh at your enemies!” From my earliest years, I’ve done comedy writing with my family, and one of my greatest passions in life is not just cheering myself up but getting others to smile and laugh.

Even at my lowest points during my time in the hospital I still remember drawing cat faces on medical masks because it gave me a laugh and made others smile. Later in life, this would include such things as wearing a full suit ensemble and a box cut to be a knight’s helmet on my head, to deliver the newspapers.

I sometimes like to joke that my life started at its lowest point, so it’s only up from there. At times that can be debated, but despite all of this, it’s still an upward climb. I was born unable to breathe and extremely ill, and my doctor found that I had encephalitis, swelling of the brain due to infection. Seizures soon followed that has lasted my entire life. Now begins the debate if that was the lowest point of my life. When I was three, I was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, a blood cancer that affects both blood cells and bone marrow. While I went into remission after many years of chemotherapy, I was left with mental and physical scars that haunt my life to this day. Some of them, such as those on my chest, is more literal than figurative. I dealt with this along with some general problems that arose as I grew up. Because of the chemotherapy, I developed Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis which caused depression and weight gain. I haven’t always been this impressively sleek and aerodynamic.

One of my earliest memories of my mothers sometimes alternative sense of humor was at Disneyland when I was on vacation thanks to the Make A Wish Foundation. A very rude woman approached my mother at the pool where I was swimming and pointed at the hole in my chest and bellowed out “What happened to him!” My dear mother, never at a loss for words simply said back “He was shot.” She didn’t have a response to that.

As I grew older anxiety and depression ruled my life and dictated much of my decisions. One of my biggest struggles in life has always been my Neuropathy that impairs my ability to write or work with my hands. Neuropathy leads to intermittent pain all throughout my body. This on top of one of the other symptoms that are often reported in those in remission from chemotherapy, ADD/ADHD, learning disabilities, memory loss, and memory loss. Cancer does not only impact you as you go through it but continues afterward, leaving lasting impacts on your body, varying differently from cancers and treatments. The side effects or “late effects” are especially prominent in young children. Lucky me.

Throughout my entire life, I’ve struggled through my classes, and I’ve struggled through my writing. Whether for fun or for classes, I’ve always struggled to keep myself on task. I can’t count the number of times in my life I’ve stopped and simply said to myself “It may not be perfect. But I’m doing it. I will do my best.” I just keep on as a mantra, and no matter how it turns out. I will do it. Even as I write this now, my anxiety hinders me. I stop to rethink every word I say. I think and rethink everything I do.

During my time at CCM, I’ve joined in on many different clubs and taken many different roles. Despite all my troubles, I’ve found myself at home here. I’ve been the vice-president of the SGA and worked for and I run many other clubs and organizations on campus. Despite all my troubles in life, I’ve come to a point where I can get out of bed each morning and know there are people out there, I can’t wait to see and do stuff with.

“Despite My Diagnosis…” Stigma Story by CCM Student Catrina Bennett

The Youngtown Edition (the school newspaper of the County College of Morris) is working with two other CCM clubs this semester, Active Minds and Writers Club, on a series about students in the process of recovery. This series is called “Despite My Diagnosis.” Read one of these stories, by Catrina Bennett:

Catrina Bennett holds up a sign saying Despite my diagnosis, I refuse to be a statistic
Catrina Bennett

Despite my diagnosis, I refuse to be a statistic. I refuse to be just a warning story about depression, a vague message on an anti-anxiety poster, or part of a number on a graph. I know that, despite my flaws, I am strong enough to change not just my life but also the lives of those around me. My story isn’t perfect or pretty, but it certainly isn’t over.

Even as a child, my fears ran rampant in my mind and were nearly debilitating. When I brushed death in a near drowning, I was more afraid of non-existent sharks in the water than the waves suffocating me. I had few friends and everyone else made fun of the awkward, chubby girl who cried when she failed a math question. No one, not even myself, saw it, but I was crumbling under the pressure of self-invented expectations. Everything was too much, too overwhelming, and too scary.

Then, my parents got a divorce. I was glad to be rid of the late nights listening to screaming matches through thin walls while attempting to stifle my sobs with a pillow. Now, I was terrified that everything I had worked for was now restricted to a simple statistic. More likely to do poorly in school, more likely to be depressed, more likely to commit suicide, more likely (I thought) to fail. I denied my sexuality and nearly lost my best friend in the process. I stopped going to school and dropped from an AP student to a near drop-out. I stopped seeing the point in living. I was becoming a number to everyone around me: number of absences, number of panic attacks, number of medications.

The people in my life were fighting just as hard as I was to keep me afloat. My friends, family, and even teachers banded together and forced me to begin to focus on where I had succeeded in life rather than where I had failed. I began to participate in classes again. The moments when I would answer a question wrong were still devastating, but each joke and nudge in the right direction from my friends increased my determination that tomorrow I would do better. And I did. I graduated in the top 15% of my class. I started talking to my father again. I took up drawing and other hobbies to fill the time between school and work.

Most importantly, I decided that it was my duty to help others who were struggling as well. Before leaving my high school, I made sure that the GSA (gay-straight alliance) was well supported and able to provide a safe space for struggling kids. I started reading more about mental illnesses and coping mechanisms in an effort to make myself better suited to give advice or resources to others. Upon arriving at CCM, I immediately joined our Active Minds chapter. Its members both helped to restore my faith in myself and allowed me to direct others towards the help that they needed.

Today, I am no longer just a number on a chart in a therapist’s office. I may still struggle with and fall prey to the effects of my depression and anxiety. But now, I refuse to let those facts be the only ones which define me. I know that I have the ability to help myself and others. I know that I can change the statistics.

If you are struggling, please know there is help. Some resources you can utilize are the National Suicide Prevention Line at 1-800-273-8255, the Crisis Text Line if you text HOME to 741741, and the Counseling Center in the Student Community Center, Room 118.

Actor and Comedian John Morello Talks Bullying, Drugs, Diversity on April 4

Speaker Shows Parents and Caregivers How to Empower Teens to Make Good Choices

Actor, comedian, speaker and author John Morello will present his one-man show on substance abuse and choices at Whippany Park High School theater on April 4 from 7-9 p.m.

Morello’s show, entitled “D.I.R.T.,” is a humorous and touching story that creates and honest conversation about tough issues like drugs, bullying, depression and diversity.  The show explores the challenges and decisions that young people face every day. DIRT gets to the heart of issues related to self-esteem in a manner that resonates with audiences in a real and meaningful way.

The purpose of the program is to assist parents and caregivers to empower children in making healthy and responsible choices. through the show, young people will understand the impact they have on every person they meet.

The show is presented by the Hanover township Substance Awareness Council in cooperation with Whippany Park High School.