Prescription Drug Drop Installed at County Govt. Center in Morristown

Offers Safe Disposal Site for Prescription Drugs

Morris County employees and residents now have an additional location, inside the county government complex in Morristown, to safely and conveniently dispose of unwanted or leftover prescription drugs.

A new Prescription Drug Drop Box has been added by the Morris County Sheriff’s Office to the lobby of the Morris County Administration and Records Building, which is located at 10 Court St. in Morristown, directly across from the Morris County Courthouse.

“We fully support this initiative, organized by Morris County Sheriff Jim Gannon, as another positive step to deal with the opioid crisis we are facing in Morris County,’’ said Morris County Freeholder Director Doug Cabana.

It is part of a countywide effort to have residents regularly dispose of unwanted or expired medications, as part of Stigma-Free Morris County’s efforts to battle the opioid epidemic.  Similar drop off boxes have been set up across the county, in Mount Olive and other towns. To find a list of Prescription Drug Drop Box location in the county near you, please visit https://sheriff.morriscountynj.gov/community/drug/

The new locked drop box in the County Administration Building is available to the public and Morris County employees during normal business hours, Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

It is important to note that businesses or clinics may not use the collection box to dispose of medications.

“This is a central location for the public allowing people to discard their medications in a safe and secure area, while also offering convenience for county employees,” said Sheriff Gannon, who has been an advocate in the fight against the opioid epidemic.

“The gateway to this disease often begins with legally prescribed medicine that is overused or used by people other than the patient.  My hope is that by collecting and destroying unused medications, we lessen the access and thereby block potential beginnings,” Sheriff Gannon added.

The new drop box is clearly labeled to identify items that may and may not be deposited.

Acceptable items include pills, capsules, patches, vitamins, samples, pet medications and over-the-counter medications.  Medication packaging also will be accepted, such as pill bottles and small medication boxes.

Not acceptable: syringes, liquids, lances for diabetic testing, inhalers, thermometers and aerosol cans, and of course any type of trash.

Since 2013, the Morris County Sheriff’s Office has been part of the successful Prescription Drop Box Program under the Community Coalition for a Safe and Healthy Morris, (an initiative of nonprofit Morris County Prevention is Key), in conjunction with the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office and numerous Municipal Police Departments within Morris County.

The Community Coalition for a Safe and Healthy Morris looks to prevent and reduce the harmful effects of drugs in Morris County.

Since 2013, there have been 26 drop box installed at various locations in Morris County, making it easier for county residents to dispose of unused or expired medications, said Barbara Kauffman, Director of Prevention Services at Morris County Prevention is Key.

“I have been proud to work with both the Morris County Sheriff’s Office and the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office, to equip each of the Morris County Police Departments with a Prescription Drug Drop Box,’’ said Kauffman, who is the coordinator of the Community Coalition for a Safe & Healthy Morris.

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office collects the medications with 25 local police departments that host a collection unit.  The Sheriff’s Office has destroyed more than 30,000 pounds of medications in the last six years, including 6,563 pounds so far in the first half of 2018.

The medications are weighed, logged and stored prior to destruction.

Governor Christie Announces New Toolkit To Help Towns Fight Drug Addiction

Governor Chris Christie today launched the ReachNJ Municipal Toolkit, a collection of resources designed to assist local leaders as they fight the opioid epidemic in their communities.

The Governor also extended the invitation to his second Candlelight Vigil that will take place in Trenton at 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 6. Last year’s vigil on the State House steps was successful in bringing together several hundred members of the recovery community and its many supporters.

“This toolkit shares strategies for municipal officials to prevent drug abuse before it starts, to connect with those in need of help in beating an addiction and to inform people with drug problems and their families about the expanding resources available to them,” said Governor Christie.

Included in the toolkit are: Save the Dates and other materials related to the Governor’s 2nd Annual Candlelight Vigil; the “Not In My House” and Mayor’s Pledge; opioid addiction fact sheet; Social Media Graphics and web ads for placement by towns; multiple sizes of ReachNJ posters; prescription drug drop-off posters; and a sampling of ReachNJ ads and video clips.

Four out of five new heroin users started by misusing prescription painkillers. Even more alarming, a Centers for Disease Control report reveals that health care providers in the year 2012 alone wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every adult in the United States to have a bottle of pills.

In addition, an estimated 20 percent of juveniles with currently prescribed opioid medications report using those medications intentionally to get high or increase the effects of alcohol or other drugs.

To find the ReachNJ Municipal Toolkit and other prevention, treatment and recovery resources, visit www.reachnj.gov. To find help for an addiction problem, call the state’s 24/7 helpline at 1-844-REACHNJ.

Why You Shouldn’t Use the Word “Addict”

“For a long time, we’ve known that language plays a huge role in how we think about people and how people think about themselves. Words have to change so attitudes change.”

Michael Botticelli, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy in The Boston Globe

Addiction is a disease.

It’s important that we use language that frames it as a health issue and shows respect to people with an addiction and to their families who are impacted. Just like we would with any other disease, like diabetes or asthma.

A person shouldn’t be defined or labeled by his or her disease or illness, it is something they have. For example: Instead of calling someone a “diabetic,” it’s preferable to use person-first language and say “someone with diabetes.” The same goes with the word “addict.”

We have a choice when we communicate. We can use words that perpetuate the negative stigma around substance use – words that label people with an addiction in a negative, shameful and judgmental way. Or we can use words that are compassionate, supportive and respectful – words that helps others understand substance use disorder as the health issue that it is.

Why You Shouldn’t Use the Word “Addict”