Stigma Free Morris County: Netcong Joins Countywide Initiative

MORRIS TOWNS WORKING TOGETHER TO PROMOTE TREATMENT AND RECOVERY FOR MENTAL ILLNESS AND ADDICTION

 The Netcong Council has passed a resolution declaring the borough Stigma-Free, making the total 32 of Morris County’s 39 towns, along with hospitals, schools, nonprofit agencies, and law enforcement groups that have joined the countywide “Stigma Free’’ initiative.

The overriding goal is to help eradicate the stigma associated with mental illness and substance abuse disorders, and to get people into treatment – no questions asked.

“Thanks to initiatives such as Sheriff James Gannon’s Hope One mobile unit, Netcong has worked toward being a Stigma-Free community,’’ said Netcong Mayor Joseph Nametko.

“I am proud our Borough Council passed the resolution making Netcong an official Stigma-Free Borough. With this designation, we will work with our local organizations to insure we live up to the Stigma-Free title,’’ he added.

Netcong is the newest member of a less-than-two-year-old grass roots movement that recognizes the high prevalence of mental illness and substance use disorders in our communities.

The Stigma-Free initiative promotes re-education and understanding that can lead to treatment and recovery – minus the stigma associated with these illnesses.

“Bringing our entire county community together with a concerted and united effort to help affected people seek recovery, without fear of stigma or reprisal, is quite a remarkable accomplishment,’’ said Morris County Freeholder Director Doug Cabana.Netcong joins a vast majority of Morris County municipalities that have signed on as Stigma-Free communities. Leaders of this movement from across the county are now working with school districts and faith-based groups to become active participants.

In addition to Netcong, other Stigma-Free towns are Boonton, Boonton Township, Butler, Chatham Borough, Chatham Township, Chester Borough, Chester Township, Denville, Dover, East Hanover, Hanover, Jefferson, Lincoln Park, Long Hill, Madison, Mendham Borough, Mine Hill, Montville, Mount Olive, Morris Plains, Morristown, Morris Township, Mountain Lakes, Parsippany, Pequannock, Randolph, Rockaway Borough, Rockaway Township, Roxbury, Victory Gardens, and Washington Township, plus Morris County.

“It is support shown for this Stigma-Free initiative by towns like Netcong, and Mayor Nametko and the Council and their residents, that can make this grass roots effort succeed,’’ said Freeholder Kathy DeFillippo, the board’s liaison on Stigma-Free issues.

The Morris County Board of Freeholders in 2016 passed a resolution designating Morris County as a Stigma-Free County, joining an already established movement as a partner.

A Stigma Free websitewww.morriscountystigmafree.org provides a members-provided wealth of information and resources, and a calendar of upcoming events related to mental illness and substance abuse.  A Stigma-Free Toolkit also is available for towns, schools, and faith-based communities.

Here are a few of many voices in Morris County supporting the initiative:

Chester Borough Mayor Janet Hoven: “Mental illness and drug abuse touch the lives of many, not only in Chester Borough, but in all of society. No one should feel less of a person regardless of an illness or addiction.  We support the initiative and hope that through this program, all residents will feel accepted and supported by all.’’

Chester Township Mayor Marcia Asdal:  “We understand that mental illness and addiction affect every community, and we know that no family or school or business is immune.’’

Morris Plains Mayor Frank Druetzler: “It is important to understand the difficulties for individuals and families of dealing with mental illness and substance abuse, how these illnesses can destroy lives and families. The Stigma Free initiative is an important countywide step to help move people towards recovery, without fear of stigma or reprisal.’’

Hanover Mayor Ronald F. Francioli.  “As a stigma-free community, we want individuals to feel free to seek help and rehabilitation without fear of judgment or reprisal.’’ 

As part of the countywide initiative, residents are urged to take the Stigma Free Pledge: https://morriscountystigmafree.org/take-the-pledge/

For information on the disease of mental illness, visit www.nami.org and for information on NAMI’s national Stigma Free effort, visit: https://www.nami.org/stigmafree

Stigma is defined as a mark of disgrace which results from the judgment by others. When an individual is labeled by their illness they experience judgment and prejudice. Stigma brings experiences and feelings of shame, embarrassment, distress, hopelessness and reluctance to seek or accept help.

Apply for Funding for Mental Health First Aid!

Apply for Funding for Mental Health First Aid!The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recently released two funding announcements totaling almost $59 million to fund Mental Health First Aid projects. We encourage eligible organizations to submit applications. We want to draw your attention to the fact that Mental Health First Aid has updated curricula that responds to the national opioid epidemic by teaching people how to identify and respond to people in need. Learn how to use this opportunity to get funding for your Mental Health First Aid program.

Who is eligible: any city, county, state government, school, social service agency, faith-based organization, mental health or addiction provider, college or university, hospital or healthcare system, police department, Fire or EMS department and organization servicing veterans or their families. If you are considering submitting an application, be sure to complete the registration process immediately.

Mental Health Awareness Training Grants
DUE: JUNE 8, 2018
Funding:

  • Almost $16 million total.
  • Up to $125,000/year over three years to 126 non-profit organizations.

Purpose:

  • Recognize the signs and symptoms of mental disorders, particularly serious mental illness.
  • Establish linkages with school- and/or community-based mental health agencies to refer for the appropriate services or supports.
  • Train emergency services personnel, veterans, law enforcement, fire department personnel and others to identify people with mental disorders and employ crisis de-escalation techniques.
  • Educate individuals about resources in the community for individuals experiencing mental health or substance use challenges.

More Information: https://www.samhsa.gov/grants/grant-announcements/sm-18-009

Project AWARE State Education Agency Grants
DUE: JUNE 4, 2018
Funding:

  • More than $42 million total.
  • Up to $1.8 million/ year for up to five years to as many as 23 State Educational Agencies (SEAs) and Tribal Educational Agencies.

Purpose: Build or expand the capacity of SEAs in partnership with State Mental Health Agencies (SMHAs) overseeing school-aged youth and local education agencies (LEAS) to:

  • Increase awareness of mental health issues among school-aged youth.
  • Provide training for school personnel and other adults who interact with school-aged youth to detect and respond to mental health issues.
  • Connect school-aged youth who may have behavioral health issues, including serious emotional disturbance (SED) or serious mental illness (SMI), and their families to needed services.

More Information: https://www.samhsa.gov/grants/grant-announcements/sm-18-006

Webinars and Conference Calls
Join us on Thursday, May 3, 2018, from 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. ET for an informational webinar that will discuss:

  • An overview of Mental Health First Aid.
  • Using Mental Health First Aid in your funding opportunity application.
  • Mental Health First Aid training implementation options.
  • Specific Mental Health First Aid curriculum content developed as a response to the opioid crisis.
  • Other curricula formats available for adults who work with youth, first responders, older adults, higher education, veterans and Spanish-speaking communities.

SAMHSA will host additional webinars and conference calls to review the details of each announcement.

Chester Borough Joins Morris County Stigma-Free Initiative

 The Chester Borough Council has passed a resolution to declare the township Stigma-Free, making the total 31 of the county’s 39 towns that have joined the Morris County “Stigma Free’’ initiative, which aims to help eradicate the stigma associated with mental illness and substance abuse disorders.

The Borough joins its neighbor Chester Township the newest members of  the grass roots movement that recognizes the high prevalence of mental illness and substance use disorders in our communities.

The Stigma-Free initiative promotes re-education and understanding that can lead to treatment and recovery – minus the stigma associated with these illnesses.

“The  Mayor and Council of Chester Borough are pleased to join our neighboring communities in fighting the stigma associated with mental illness and addiction abuse through the Morris County “Stigma Free “initiative,’’ said Chester Borough Mayor Janet Hoven.

“Mental illness and drug abuse touch the lives of many, not only in Chester Borough, but in all of society. No one should feel less of a person regardless of an illness or addiction.  We support the initiative and hope that through this program, all residents will feel accepted and supported by all,’’ Mayor Hoven added.

Chester Borough joins a majority of Morris County municipalities that have signed on as Stigma-Free communities.

Other Stigma-Free towns are Boonton, Boonton Township, Butler, Chatham Borough, Chatham Township, Chester Township, Denville, Dover, East Hanover, Hanover, Jefferson, Lincoln Park, Long Hill, Madison, Mendham Borough, Mine Hill, Montville, Mount Olive, Morris Plains, Morristown, Morris Township, Mountain Lakes, Parsippany, Pequannock, Randolph, Rockaway Borough, Rockaway Township, Roxbury, Victory Gardens, and Washington Township, plus Morris County and the Montville Township School District.

“This initiative is an important step in bringing our entire county community together with a concerted and united effort to help affected people seek recovery, without fear of stigma or reprisal,’’ said Morris County Freeholder Director Doug Cabana.

“It is support shown for this Stigma-Free initiative by towns like Chester Borough, and Mayor Hoven and the Council and their residents, that can make this grass roots effort succeed,’’ said Freeholder Kathy DeFillippo, the board’s liaison on Stigma-Free issues.

The Morris County Board of Freeholders in 2016 passed a resolution designating Morris County as a Stigma-Free County, joining an already established movement as a partner, and urging all of the county’s 39 towns to join the movement.

There is a Stigma Free websitewww.morriscountystigmafree.org to call attention to the initiative, provide information and resources, and a calendar of upcoming events related to mental illness and substance abuse. A Stigma Free Toolkit also is available for towns and communities.

The goal of this grass-roots Stigma Free initiative is to disseminate information and foster a stigma-free environment where people are free from judgment and can get the help they need to recover.

Here are just a few of the many voices in Morris County supporting the initiative:

Chester Township Mayor Marcia Asdal: “We understand that mental illness and addiction affect every community, and we know that no family or school or business is immune.’’

Washington Township Police Chief Jeff Almer: “This will make residents, as well as the police officers, more aware of the illnesses and work to create an environment where we can assist with wellness and recovery by providing needed support and resources.’’

Randolph Mayor Christine Carey: “This initiative recognizes that the stigma associated with mental illness, including substance abuse disorders, has been identified as the primary reason individuals fail to seek help.  We want to create a culture in our community that supports our residents in asking for help and in seeking treatment.’’

Lincoln Park Mayor David Runfeldt: “The issues of dependency and mental health affect all of us in our communities one way or another,’’ said “This initiative gets assistance to those who need it and acceptance to those that deserve it.”

As part of the countywide initiative, residents are urged to take the Stigma Free Pledge: https://morriscountystigmafree.org/take-the-pledge/

For information on the disease of mental illness, visit www.nami.org and for information on NAMI’s national Stigma Free effort, visit: https://www.nami.org/stigmafree

Chester Township Joins Morris County Stigma-Free Initiative

The Chester Township Council has passed a resolution to declare the township Stigma-Free, making the total 30 of the county’s 39 towns that have joined the Morris County “Stigma Free’’ initiative, which aims to help eradicate the stigma associated with mental illness and substance abuse disorders.

This grass roots initiative recognizes the high prevalence of mental illness and substance use disorders in our communities. It promotes re-education and understanding that can lead to treatment and recovery – minus the stigma associated with these illnesses.

“We understand that mental illness and addiction affect every community, and we know that no family or school or business is immune, said Chester Township Mayor Marcia Asdal. So Chester Township is proud to join the Stigma-Free initiative in Morris County, to help encourage people in our community their friends or family members or colleagues in trouble to seek treatment that could help lead them to recovery.’’

Chester Township joins a majority of Morris County municipalities that have signed on as Stigma-Free communities.

Other Stigma-Free towns are Boonton, Boonton Township, Butler, Chatham Borough, Chatham Township, Denville, Dover, East Hanover, Hanover, Jefferson, Lincoln Park, Long Hill, Madison, Mendham Borough, Mine Hill, Montville, Mount Olive, Morris Plains, Morristown, Morris Township, Mountain Lakes, Parsippany, Pequannock, Randolph, Rockaway Borough, Rockaway Township, Roxbury, Victory Gardens, and Washington Township, plus Morris County and the Montville Township School District.

“This initiative is an important step in bringing our entire county community together with a concerted and united effort to help affected people seek recovery, without fear of stigma or reprisal,’’ said Morris County Freeholder Director Doug Cabana. “Support shown for this Stigma-Free initiative by towns like Chester Township, and their officials and residents, that can make this grass roots effort succeed. Thank you Chester Township!Stigma-Free Morris County poster

The Morris County Board of Freeholders in 2016 passed a resolution designating Morris County as a Stigma-Free County, joining an already established movement as a partner, and urging all of the county’s 39 towns to join the movement.

There is a Stigma Free website to call attention to the initiative, provide information and resources, and a calendar of upcoming events related to mental illness and substance abuse. A Stigma Free Toolkit also is available for towns and communities.

The goal of this grass-roots Stigma Free initiative is to disseminate information and foster a stigma-free environment where people are free from judgment and can get the help they need to recover.

Here are just a few of the many voices in Morris County supporting the initiative:

Morristown Mayor Timothy Dougherty: “I hope that this designation will help those who are affected seek the assistance they need without fear of judgment.”

Pequannock Mayor Melissa Florance-Lynch: “I am thrilled that the Township of Pequannock has joined the Morris County Stigma-Free initiative. In one way or another, everyone is affected by problems of mental illness and substance abuse and we want people to know the community is here to help.”

Mendham Mayor Neil Henry: “Only by removing the perception of shame or embarrassment will we erase those feelings that prevent our neighbors, friends and family members from seeking help.

Lincoln Park Mayor David Runfeldt: “The issues of dependency and mental health affect all of us in our communities one way or another.”

As part of the countywide initiative, residents are urged to take the Stigma Free Pledge: https://morriscountystigmafree.org/take-the-pledge/

For information on the disease of mental illness, visit www.nami.org and for information on NAMI’s national Stigma Free effort, visit: https://www.nami.org/stigmafree

Stigma is defined as a mark of disgrace which results from the judgment by others. When an individual is labeled by their illness they experience judgment and prejudice. Stigma brings experiences and feelings of shame, embarrassment, distress, hopelessness and reluctance to seek or accept help.